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Subject: RE: recover lost recording file
From: VanBaren, Gerald (AGRE) (Gerald.VanBaren_at_smiths-aerospace.com)
Date: 2004-10-07


> -----Original Message-----
> From: rockbox-bounces_at_cool.haxx.se
> [mailto:rockbox-bounces_at_cool.haxx.se]On Behalf Of Linus
> Nielsen Feltzing
> Sent: Thursday, October 07, 2004 10:11 AM
> To: Rockbox development
> Subject: Re: recover lost recording file
>
>
> devtrick wrote:
> > i was searching for hints about the naming of these
> > temp files - have they a name? where are they stored
> > at (usually at the record folder defined in the
> > options menue - or root - or .rockbox)?
>
> There is no temp file. The file is named after the time of day you
> started the recording, eg "RYYYYMMDD-HHMMSS.mp3" in the
> directory where
> you have selected to put the recordings.
>
> YYYY = year
> MM = month
> DD = day
> HH = hour
> MM = minute
> SS = second
>
> Linus

Devtrick:

BE VERY CAREFUL of what you do with the unit before you have recovered the file. DO NOT WRITE ANYTHING TO THE AJR DISK!

The problem is that Rockbox did not close the file. It is all there on the disk (except perhaps a couple of seconds at the end that were in RAM and not flushed to disk) and will normally be stored contiguously... that is very helpful because you won't have to go through the FAT information.

You simply need to find the first cluster of the affected recording and save until the end cluster. You can guess the end based on the time duration of the recording times the bit rate

I used the shareware "directory snoop" program.
  http://www.briggsoft.com/dsnoop.htm
IIRC, "unerase" doesn't work because the file wasn't closed. The cluster after the _last properly closed_ file will likely be the first cluster of the file you want to recover. I used the Cluster Search to find the directory entry of the unclosed file which then told me what the first used cluster was. Based on the recording duration and rate, estimate where the end of the file will be and browse the disk sectors around that area: usually you can discern were the end of the recording is because the bit pattern goes from "noise" (MP3 recording) to a more predictable pattern (unwritten). At this point you can use the "Cluster Copy to File" command to save the raw data into a file ON YOUR PC'S HARD DRIVE, NOT on the AJR!!!! Play the resulting file: if you got it right, you will hear your recording. You may need to trim the end, but that is easy (especially compared to what you did up to this point ;-).

Suggestion: Do a practice run on a properly closed file first. The previous file (last properly closed file) is a good one to practice on.

gvb

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