Rockbox

Tasklist

FS#8316 - Various fixes to the use of "its" and "it's"

Attached to Project: Rockbox
Opened by David B (DefineByte) - Thursday, 13 December 2007, 18:13 GMT
Last edited by Thom Johansen (preglow) - Thursday, 13 December 2007, 23:24 GMT
Task Type Patches
Category Manual
Status Closed
Assigned To No-one
Operating System All players
Severity Low
Priority Normal
Reported Version Daily build (which?)
Due in Version Undecided
Due Date Undecided
Percent Complete 100%
Votes 0
Private No

Details

Substitutes the contraction "it's" with "it is" where appropriate.

Corrects the misuse of "it's" where the possesive "its" should be used.
   its.patch (11.4 KiB)
This task depends upon

Closed by  Thom Johansen (preglow)
Thursday, 13 December 2007, 23:24 GMT
Reason for closing:  Accepted
Additional comments about closing:  In which case I got the explanation I wanted :) Closing now, thanks!
Comment by Thom Johansen (preglow) - Thursday, 13 December 2007, 22:42 GMT
I'm commiting this plus some small rewrites of my own, and I will close this task. But first I would love to hear if there is some rule of thumb for doing these it's -> it is conversions. Most of them just sounded better to me when changed, but some of them puzzled me a bit. Could you shed some light on this?
Comment by David B (DefineByte) - Thursday, 13 December 2007, 23:06 GMT
"but some of them puzzled me a bit."
Don't say that, you're making me think I made a mistake. X)

its = possessive
it's = "it is" or "it has"

You should never use an apostrophe in "its" to denote possession.
Comment by Thom Johansen (preglow) - Thursday, 13 December 2007, 23:11 GMT
Sure, I'm in the clear regarding the "it's -> its" case, where using "it's" is just plain wrong, but I was primarily wondering about the "it's -> it is" cases, where both are correct but one might sometimes be preferred for reasons unknown to me.
Comment by David B (DefineByte) - Thursday, 13 December 2007, 23:21 GMT
Oh, sorry. :)

You're right, sometimes one or the other does sound better but I don't think there's a particular reason for it. The use of either is fine but it's best not to use contractions in formal English (e.g. technical manuals) and consistency is always good.

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